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Bathroom issues may loom for schools
Warren County not taking action at this point
Gender-neutral-restroomWEB
There is no room in our schools for discrimination of any kind, including discrimination against transgender students on the basis of their sex, said Attorney General Loretta Lynch concerning the presidential directive.

With President Barack Obama telling public schools to allow transgender students to use the bathroom matching their gender identity or face loss of federal dollars, local administrators are not rushing to meet the president’s directive.
“Right now it’s still boys go with boys and girls go with girls, like it’s always been,” said Director of Schools Bobby Cox in light of the president’s “guidance” that was issued Friday for all schools that receive federal dollars. “We will have to look over what it says and talk with legal counsel and then take it before the School Board.”
The joint letter was sent Friday by the Departments of Education and Justice. It included guidelines to “ensure that transgender students enjoy a supportive and nondiscriminatory school environment,” according to the Obama administration release.
“There is no room in our schools for discrimination of any kind, including discrimination against transgender students on the basis of their sex,” said Attorney General Loretta Lynch concerning the presidential directive. “This guidance gives administrators, teachers and parents the tools they need to protect transgender students from peer harassment and to identify and address unjust school policies.”
Friday’s announcement does not have the force of law but carries a clear message for schools to get in line with the policy or face losing federal funding.
The directive comes as part of an opinion by the Departments of Justice and Education concerning Title IX, the federal anti-discrimination law that applies to education. Federal law says schools that receive federal funds are not allowed to discriminate based on the student’s sex or transgender status.
Given the fact both Texas and North Carolina have taken steps to stop federal directives from making them open up their bathrooms, Cox said he wants to wait and see what Tennessee decides when it comes to the federal order.
“I do have a concern about the moral and ethical issues,” Cox said, noting there are many things that must be addressed before opening school bathrooms to where the student can choose based on their gender identification.
“There’s also a financial impact,” Cox said, should additional bathrooms be needed to conform to the federal directive.
There is the possibility of having restrooms for male, female and transgender.