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Attempt to give judicial commissoners $3 flat raise fails
Rubley, Scott.jpg
Rubley

A motion to give judicial commissioners a $3 flat raise across the board instead of a $2,500 flat increase failed due to a lack of a second at the county Budget and Finance Committee meeting Tuesday night.


At a previous meeting, the committee voted on a $2,500 flat raise and a $200 minimum and $2,000 cap longevity bonus for county employees. Commissioner Tommy Savage was advocating for the $3 raise for judicial commissioners and asked Finance Department director Justin Cotten what that would look like for the current employees. Cotten said the $3 raise would take the fulltime employees to $13.50 and $14.75, the director up to $17.73, and the part-time employees up to $12 and $13.50.


“We have barely got them hanging on,” said Savage.


Due to the number of hours judicial commissioners work, the $3 raise would impact them more than the flat $2,500 raise would. “Your normal judicial commissioners are clocking in around 2,300 hours apiece give or take a little bit because they are on call. Your part-timers are only working like 16 hours a week and that is one of the things we are having a real hard time getting is fill-ins,” said Cotten.


“The full-timers are going to get a bout a $6,000 raise,” said Savage.


Savage made a motion to give the judicial commissioners a $3 raise instead of the $2,500. The motion died when no other commissioner seconded it. Commissioner Scott Rubley said his reasoning is because if he gives one group a special raise it opens the door for everyone else to request one too.


Commissioner Cole Taylor said his decision was based on the fact he didn’t give Sanitation Department director Josh Roberts’ clerical personnel a special raise when requested.


Savage fears the county will be in trouble if the current judicial commissioners decide to quit.


“We have just got such a small pool out there and if two or three of them gets mad and quits we might have to hire an attorney to go out there and start doing that job,” said Savage. “It could really cost us a lot.”


Commissioners present at this meeting were Randy England, Christy Ross, Taylor, Savage, and Rubley.