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What did Hillary really say?
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For the 2016 presidential race, I'm assuming Hillary Clinton's running because of how ostentatiously she's not made up her mind. By sitting tight, she basically freezes potential Democratic rivals in place, passively using her lead in opinion polls to prevent others from raising money.
Otherwise, can't we please, please wait until 2016 to obsess about it around the clock? There will be three World Series, two NBA championships and a couple of NCAA football seasons between now and then. Politically speaking, we'll be in a different world.
But no, we're not going to get even an August recess if the Washington infotainment industry gets its way. Witness the recent stir over Clinton's ill-advised interview with The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg, a colloquy quickly cartoonized into a rebuke of President Obama that never actually happened.
Clinton said this: "Great nations need organizing principles, and 'Don't do stupid stuff' is not an organizing principle."
Actually, President Obama's version of the slogan was earthier. However, turning Hillary's paraphrase into an insult required ignoring almost everything she said about his administration's foreign policy.
Why had Obama used the phrase?
"I think he was trying to communicate to the American people that he's not going to do something crazy," Clinton said. "I've sat in too many rooms with the president. He's thoughtful; he's incredibly smart, and able to analyze a lot of different factors that are all moving at the same time. I think he is cautious because he knows what he inherited, both the two wars and the economic front, and he has expended a lot of capital and energy trying to pull us out of the hole we're in. So I think that that's a political message."
But did Hillary really argue that if Obama had armed Syrian "moderates" as she'd recommended as secretary of state, that the United States wouldn't have to be bombing ISIS fanatics in Iraq today -- blowing our own tanks and APCs to smithereens that they captured from fleeing Iraqi soldiers?
That was another headline take from The Atlantic interview. Once again, no, she did not. Indeed, she reminded Goldberg that the chapter on Syria in her recent book was entitled "A Wicked Problem."
"I can't sit here today," Clinton said, "and say that if we had done what I recommended, and what (then-U.S. Ambassador) Robert Ford recommended, that we'd be in a demonstrably different place ... I don't think we can claim to know."
Actually, The Atlantic interview is fascinating, if not for the ballyhooed reasons. Hillary Clinton has provocative things to say about U.S. foreign policy -- some alarming, and others more about political positioning than anything else. Come 2016, there will be plenty of time to discuss them.
Arkansas Times columnist Gene Lyons can be reached at eugenelyons2@yahoo.com.