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Blood moon Wednesday morning
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Visibility of Wednesday morning's eclipse.

 

The moon will glow red during the pre-dawn hours Wednesday morning.

 

The blood moon, or Hunter's Moon as it is sometimes called, will take place in conjunction with a full lunar eclipse. The celestial event is expected to begin here shortly before sunrise Wednesday morning. The viewing schedule in the Central Time Zone begins at around 4 a.m. as the moon will become progressively redder as it enters the Earth's shadow. The eclipse will intensify until the moon is completely eclipsed at 5:25 a.m. The time from eclipse to the moon fully re-appearing before it sets will be about one hour. During that time the moon will not only glow red but will it will also appear as a fiery ring once the Earth's shadow blocks it from the sun, allowing just a glimmer of light to be reflected around its edges.

 

The eclipse will be viewable across the nation although those on the east coast will have to look at the moon at a lower angle in the western sky. Weather will also have something to do with view ability. The forecast for this area gives us a fair chance at getting a good look at the blood moon and eclipse given the cloud cover that has overtaken the Nursery Capitol the past couple of days.

 

The blood moon gets its name from the red color it exhibits when the light from the Earth's atmosphere is refracted on it during an eclipse. This blood moon is one of four such rare moons that will happen within a two-year period, culminating next year.

 

This eclipse; however, is even more rare due to its timing. The Wednesday morning eclipse is often called a Selene lion eclipse because viewers will get the rare opportunity to both see the eclipsed moon set and the sun rise, simultaneously. Such an event should be impossible but because the Earth's atmosphere bends light from both the sun and the moon, they are made to look higher in the sky than they actually are giving observers are short peek at the event.